Mes: abril 2013

Lazos entre los estudiantes en Booth

Comparto una entrada que ha hecho en su blog personal una compañera de clase de primero año, en la que escribe sobre los lazos o “bonding” entre los estudiantes de la escuela, y cómo compara con escuelas como Kellogg, Wharton, Tuck y otras.

Lo cierto es que llevaba tiempo queriendo escribir sobre este tema, y la entrada en el blog de mi compañera me parece fantástica porque describe realmente bien el “bonding” entre los estudiantes de Booth, y la “sensación de comunidad” que hay entre nosotros. La verdad es que creo que existe mucha falta de información.

School Ties

One of the questions that I am often asked about Booth from prospective students and recent admits is, “If there are no cohorts and students live all over Chicago does Booth really have much of a community?” According to Poets and Quants’ article Chicago Booth vs. Kellogg, “The school purposely lacks core cohort groups and has no residence halls for its MBAs, factors that make it harder for real community to occur. Some Chicago students say the school still lacks the camaraderie you’ll find at many other b-schools, especially Kellogg, and that some students graduate from Chicago with only a handful of people they would call friends.” I’ve also repeatedly read comments like, “the flexible curriculum does not allow for bonding,” and “Booth is a commuter school.”

There is a lot of information about Booth on the web. However, in my opinion much of it is misinformation disseminated by people who heard something from someone who knows someone. So does Chicago Booth have much of a community? I think that the first step is to define what someone means by community. Kellogg is known for having a strong community, but so is Tuck and these are two very different schools. So what’s the standard. I think that there are two main ways to define a school’s community: tight-knit and engaged.

I will say upfront that Booth does not have a tight-knit community. However, I would argue that neither do schools like Kellogg and Wharton (both of which are known for having strong communities). When people say a school’s students are tight-knit they often are saying that everybody knows one another. Everyone goes to the same parties and bars and the class does everything together. That’s the type of community that schools like Tuck, Johnson, and Haas foster. However, these schools also have class sizes of under 300 students. I’d argue that when any class has more than 400 students it’s impossible for the students to be tight-knit by that definition. Tuck students know all 275 of their classmates at least by name. I too can say that I know roughly the same number of classmates by name. However, I have about 300 additional people in my class. When you think about knowing over 200 people in 6 months’ time then you start to understand that that’s a lot of people and knowing over 300 more is virtually impossible.

So then if a school isn’t tight-knit by the above definition does that mean that it does not have a strong community? Of course not! One of Kellogg’s claims to fame is its distinctive student culture. However, that sense of a Kellogg community comes as a result of engagement. And I will vehemently argue that Booth has a community that is just as strong based on this metric. “Bullshit!” you say? How can I possibly claim that when students live all over Chicago and so far from campus? That’s impossible because there is no core curriculum nor cohorts.

First, I need to clear up some common misconceptions, the biggest one being that Booth students are dispersed all over Chicago. No, most students do not live in Hyde Park near Harper Center. Yes, the vast majority of us commute anywhere from 15-30 minutes to campus. However, over 80% of students live within a 2 mile strip of the downtown neighborhoods the Loop, South Loop, and Streeterville. Heck, over 60% of students live in three buildings that are often referred to as the dorms (Millenium Park Plaza, Columbus Plaza, MDA). Even in the South Loop it is impossible to sneak in and out of 1130 Michigan Ave without running into someone from Booth. Just because Booth students do not live in close proximity to the school does not mean that they don’t live in close proximity to one another.

So what’s up with living downtown? It’s probably the same motivation that drives Wharton students to live in Rittenhouse Square instead of University City where Huntsman Hall is located: lifestyle. MBAs aren’t like typical grad school students. Most graduate students enter their programs immediately after undergrad. MBAs have been out of school for at least 3 years (some of us even 10+ years) and have become used to living a certain way. If we have the opportunity to maintain that lifestyle (lack of income and debt be damned), we’re going to do it. Hyde Park is lovely, but most of us just aren’t about that 2.5 kids, Sunday at the park life quite yet. Chicago’s public transportation makes it easy to commute to school and we have lockers so that we can keep the stuff we need on campus to avoid extra trips. Given these conveniences we choose to live where the Chicago’s night life does.

Now that we’ve cleared up one myth, let’s address the lack of cohorts. Technically, Booth does have cohorts. In fact I just participated in a cohort scavenger hunt on Saturday (no babies were harmed during the event, but some were subjected to awkward holding). However, cohorted learning is only in place for Booth’s one required course, LEAD, which takes place during orientation and the first 4 weeks of the first quarter. After LEAD there are a few big cohort based activities like Golden Gargoyles and Leadership Challenge, but for the most part cohort activities are spearheaded by cohort members and the graduate business council (i.e. cohort trivia, cohort t-shirt day, etc.). Although students aren’t required to be at these events there is always a very healthy turnout (it could be a function of the free food and drink that is always offered).

I think this illustrates the beauty that is Booth. At it’s core this place is an exercise in free markets. Everything is driven by students’ choices and Booth students choose to be actively involved with the school. I have yet to go to any event that wants for participants. The “Running of the Bulls” (annual Booth vs. Kellogg basketball game at the United Center) sold out in an hour. Demand for Winter Formal resulted in 100 extra tickets being released. The tech trek required an application because there wasn’t enough capacity for all of the students who wanted to attend. The list can go on and on. Even without the typical structures to build school loyalty and student body engagement, students are so tied to Booth we often struggle to excoriate ourselves from the “Booth Bubble.” Chicago is a virtual treasure trove of people yet most of my classmates struggle to spend time with anyone who isn’t a Booth student. I have friends that I’ve known for years living in Chicago and I think I’ve only hung out with one of them one time. After ending our Valentine’s Day with a McDonald’s picnic on her living room floor one of my friends and I vowed to go explore Chicago’s happy hour scene without 250 of our closest classmates. Thus far the closest we’ve come is LPF (Liquidity Preference Function) at Underground Wonder Bar with only 150 of our closest classmates. Everything from Friday night parties to week long spring breaks to summer internships always seems to include classmates.

With a city as large as Chicago it would be easy for us to leave Harper Center and scatter amongst the throngs only to see one another for classes and recruiting. However, that’s not what happens. There is more activity going on at Booth than any person can keep track of and the majority of it is student run. My spring break trek to Africa – organized by the Chicago African Business Group. My winter career trek to NYC – organized by the Media, Entertainment, and Sports Group. Follies – student written, produced, and performed. Booth students choose to invest their time in making sure this community is thriving. There is an overflow of people clamoring to participate in Admit Weekend, career services, admissions, and more. Oftentimes these activities require hours of work and we still want to to do it. I think this speaks volumes to the ties people have to Booth.

I will readily admit that although Booth has a very vibrant community it is built differently than at other schools. The flexible curriculum is not conducive to having prolonged avenues for socializing (i.e. dorms, curriculum cohorts, etc.). In allowing people to pick their classes, schedule, and professors (and study groups within those classes) it’s very much so a choose your own adventure kind of place. Booth is set up so that students aren’t interacting with the same people day in and day out. Booth fosters breadth of socializing, but it’s up to the individual to determine where to seek depth. One of the best consequences of this breadth is a greater sense of cohesion between the 1st and 2nd year classes. This is the very opposite of the structure at most schools where the depth of socializing is built into the program and it’s up to students to seek out a wider breadth. Truth be told the breadth was difficult for me at first. I felt that I was meeting a lot of people but not really forming deeper relationships. I wasn’t doing on campus recruiting so I was always interacting with different people but not spending significant time with anyone. It wasn’t until ski trip when I had a week of consistent socializing with people that I started really making friends. The opportunities to really bond with people are all over the place at Booth. However, it might take a little patience and being proactive to figure out what those opportunities are for you.

I will tell any prospective student how much I love being here, but I will also say that it isn’t for everybody. If you really like structure and aren’t looking to try something different then Booth isn’t the school for you. If you tend not to be proactive in getting to know people and don’t like feeling somewhat uncomfortable at times then you probably shouldn’t be here. However, if the bevvy of choice appeals to you or you want to try a social environment that is different from what you’re used to then this might could be the place for you.

Artículo original aquí.

Anuncios

¿Cuánto cuesta realmente un MBA y cómo se puede pagar?

De forma frecuente recibo preguntas sobre cuánto cuesta realmente el MBA en una escuela como Booth y cómo uno puede afrontar los costes, así que me animo a escribir sobre ello. Y es que después de trabajar muy duro y pasar un proceso de admisión realmente exigente, por fin llega la soñada admisión y te preguntas cómo afrontar el dineral que cuesta el programa. Lo cierto es que los costes son una barbaridad, parecidos a lo que puede costar comprarse un apartamento en España.

Antes de nada, ¿realmente merece la pena? Con toda probabilidad si preguntáis a cualquier estudiante de las escuelas top-10 estadounidenses os dirán que sin lugar a dudas sí. Y es que si solo consideramos los aspectos monetarios, la media de un estudiante de Booth, Harvard, Stanford, y escuelas del estilo es amortizarlo entre 3 y 5 años después de haberlo acabado. Lo cierto es que las perspectivas a medio/largo plazo son muy buenas, y salir sin un buen trabajo de aquí es prácticamente imposible (si no lo consigues es que realmente no quieres encontrarlo). Además, si quitamos el dinero de la ecuación, hay un montón de cosas que un MBA te aporta que son incluso más importantes, como cambiar de carrera profesional, una network muy potente, conocimientos, experiencia de vida, etc.

Personalmente, lo creáis o no a mi el MBA me ha aportado un valor inmenso y veo el mundo de manera muy distinta. Si me trasladase tres años atrás al momento en que decidí apostar por un top MBA, dudaría muchísimo menos de lo que dudé (bueno, lo cierto es que dudé bastante poco) y sin pestañear lo haría. Mi mujer, que era mucho más escéptica, ahora es la fan número 1. El MBA nos ha abierto las puertas a unos mundos que nos eran completamente desconocidos. Antes del MBA, “you don’t know what you don’t know” y hasta que no te lo enseñan no sabes lo mucho que no sabíamos.

¿Cuáles son los costes reales?

Los costes de hacer un MBA en una escuela como Booth son los siguientes (he hecho una estimación basándome en los costes aproximados que vienen en esta página, adaptándolos un poco):

  • Matrícula: 20 clases + LEAD: $112.000 en total (aunque puedes hacer hasta 6 clases más gratis).
  • Otros fees pagados a la escuela: $3.000 en total (computer allowance, student life fee, …).
  • Material de estudio (libros, coursepacks, etc.): $1.000-2.000 en total. De todas maneras en Booth hay un mercado de segunda mano muy potente utilizando esta web que creó un compañero de clase: BoothSell. Yo lo único que no he vendido es lo que quiero quedarme para la posteridad.
  • Seguro médico: Hace un par de años varios europeos conseguimos un acuerdo con una aseguradora francesa, que nos cubre a todos los europeos por 600-700 euros al año. Si eres mujer, sin embargo, este seguro no te vale (por temas de embarazo y demás) y tienes que pedir el seguro de la universidad, que cuesta unos $2.700 por año.
  • Alojamiento: Entre $600 y $2.000 al mes, depende del edificio vivas, tipo de apartamento y si vives solo o compartes piso. De todas maneras, hay varias formas de pagar menos (ver más abajo).
  • Transporte: $1.000 al año, tren a la escuela, o la bici, taxis, etc.
  • Comida: $400-800 al mes, aunque esto depende mucho de si sales a cenar con frecuencia o no.
  • Teléfono, electricidad, etc.: En el precio del apartamento suele estar incluido Internet, cable TV, gas, calefacción, etc. (al menos en donde vivo yo). Lo que no incluye es la electricidad (pago unos $20-25 al mes). Por otro lado, otro gasto es el contrato de móvil, unos $50-100 al mes dependiendo de qué compañía, minutos, etc.
  • Extra: aquí ya cada uno. Si viajas mucho, compras mucho, etc. esto subirá.

Vamos, que entre unas cosas y otras, el coste del MBA ronda los $150.000 en total los dos años. Y esto no es todo. Hay que añadir el “coste de la oportunidad”. Es decir, durante el tiempo que dura el programa hubieras podido seguir trabajando, por lo que dejas de ingresar un salario durante más de dos años.

¿Cómo puedo financiar el MBA?

Lo bueno es que Booth ofrece préstamos a todos sus estudiantes, incluyendo estudiantes internacionales. No es para nada normal que una escuela de préstamos a los estudiantes internacionales (que no tenemos el famoso “credit history” americano). A los que estéis pensando en hacer un MBA fuera y necesitéis pedir un préstamo, os aconsejo que os informéis muy bien de qué escuelas ofrecen préstamos a estudiantes internacionales.

En Booth depende del año, pero suelen dar entre 80 y 90% del coste total del programa (incluyendo matrícula más gastos de vivir). Las condiciones no están mal. De hecho, conozco a compañeros que lo han pedido entero incluso no necesitando todo el dinero (por ejemplo, emprendedores que utilizan el dinero para dar los primeros pasos).

¿Cómo puedo reducir los costes?

A continuación hago un resumen con varias maneras para reducir los costes o para ingresar dinero durante el programa:

  • Becas del país de origen: Lo mejor para eliminar casi todos los gastos es por supuesto conseguir una beca de las que otorgan los países de origen. En España, hay bastantes fundaciones que ofrecen becas de posgrado que te pagan todo el MBA (matrícula más gastos) como Caja Madrid, La Caixa, Ramón Areces Rafael del Pino, etc.), en esta guía de Club-MBA listamos todas. Conseguirlas es muy complicado: dan muy pocas al año y la competencia es enorme. Yo estuve muy cerca pero al final no conseguí ninguna. De mis compañeros españoles hay varios con becas de Ramón Areces, Villar Mir, Navarra, …
  • Scholarships de Booth en el momento de la admisión: Otra manera de reducir la matrícula es si la escuela te da una “scholarship” en el momento de la admisión, que viene a ser una beca que te reduce el coste de la matrícula. En Booth dan bastantes, desde $10.000 hasta full-tuition (que cubren toda la matrícula) y todos los admitidos pueden conseguirlas (es decir, no hay que solicitarlas sino que la escuela te considera automáticamente). Mi mujer recibió half tuition (reducción de $50.000 en la matrícula) y varios de primer año recibieron cantidades similares. Aunque estas scholarships en principio se otorgan solo cuando te hacen la oferta de admisión, hay rumores de que se pueden conseguir también después de admitido y antes de haber aceptado la oferta. Por ejemplo, si vas al Comité de Admisiones y les enseñas que tienes admisión en una escuela de la competencia (tipo Harvard, Stanford y Wharton) y estás decidiendo entre ofertas quizá se rasquen el bolsillo y te den algo para que “motivarte” a que aceptes (que conste que yo lo intenté pero no funcionó). Y también parece que depende del año. Quizá os preguntéis, ¿en qué se basan para dar scholarships? Pues probablemente en méritos como candidato (lo fuerte que sea tu solicitud), y lo poco representado que esté tu perfil en la escuela. Por ejemplo, si tienes un perfil muy bueno y además eres un perfil poco común, probablemente las escuelas top se te rifen. Ser de un país poco representado, tener una experiencia laboral poco representada en la escuela, ser mujer, ser de una raza poco representada, etc. son cosas que ayudan. Un caso extremo sería ser mujer y venir de un país africano y tener una solicitud potente.
  • Scholarships por méritos académicos: Durante el primer año si sacas muy buenas notas te dan “merit scholarships” para el segundo. Y no solo por notas, también te dan scholarships por otros motivos. Por ejemplo, te dan por ayudar mucho a la escuela, otras por liderazgo, otras por construir lazos con nuevas empresas (mi mujer recibió una por haber hecho las prácticas MBA en una venture capital que nunca había reclutado en la escuela), otras patrocinadas por alumnis, etc.
  • Summer internship (prácticas de verano): Entre primer y segundo año realizamos prácticas en empresas (como recordaréis, en mi caso las hice en McKinsey). Depende de la empresa y el lugar, pero vamos lo normal es cobrar alrededor de $10.000-$13.000 al mes durante la duración de las prácticas (aunque hay bastante gente que cobra bastante más, y otros que las hacen en non-profits y casi no cobran). Lo normal es que dure unos tres meses, aunque hay gente que los hace más cortos y otros que los hacen más largos o incluso hacen dos y hacen casi cuatro meses.
  • Remuneración por colaborar con la escuela: También te dan dinero cuando colaboras con la escuela en algunos de los roles que hay (por ejemplo, a mi me dieron $2.000 por ser Admission Fellow, y también dan bastante más a los LEAD Facilitators, y también otros roles como Career Advisor). También pagan $30 la hora a los Teaching Assistants (TAs), que son los estudiantes que colaboran con los profesores en sus asignaturas. Los TAs corrigen los trabajos y los exámenes, hacen las review sessions (clases extras de repaso), etc. Lo normal es que cada profesor tenga entre uno y cuatro TAs, por lo que hay muchos. Para ser TA hay que haber hecho la asignatura previamente y que el profesor te quiera como TA (depende del profesor, pero normalmente si tuviste una A y se lo pides probablemente te dejará serlo). Mi mujer fue TA de un profesor que imparte Microeconomics durante el pasado trimestre, y yo iba a serlo de Building the New Venture pero al final preferí no hacerlo porque durante ese trimestre estaba hasta arriba entre asignaturas, Admission Fellows, Club-MBA y mil otras cosas. Además la profesora quería que lo fuese en la clase que impartía a PhD en otra escuela de la Universidad que me atraía menos. También se puede colaborar con los profesores como Research Assistant (les ayudas en sus investigaciones académicas durante el MBA).
  • Competiciones, Entrepreneurship Intenrship Program, etc: Hay muchas competiciones tanto dentro de la escuela como a nivel nacional, en plan competiciones de casos como el de Deloitte que quedé segundo, de marketing, de finanzas, etc. También si decides emprender durante el año y no haces prácticas de verano o las haces en startups, te dan unos $6.000 del Entrepreneurship Internship Program (EIP).
  • Ahorros en el alquiler del apartamento: Por un lado, cuando firmas el apartamento, si firmas 12 meses te dan uno gratis. Además, durante el verano todo el mundo subalquila sus apartamentos y te ahorras el alquiler. Como vivimos en una zona muy buena de Chicago, hay mucha demanda por nuestros apartamentos durante el verano (gente que vive en las afueras y quiere pasar el verano en el centro de la ciudad en edificios cerca del lago, con piscina y demás). En mi caso, subalquilé mi apartamento desde el 2 de junio (día que me fui a Madrid) hasta el 23 de septiembre (día que volví). Finalmente, si referencias a alguien y entra en un apartamento en el mismo edificio en el que estás, el edificio te da $1.000. Lo que hacemos en la escuela es que los estudiantes hacemos referencias a los que entran al año siguiente (yo hice referencia a un español que entró en septiembre, y mi mujer a otro). Y el dinero te lo repartes a medias con el que entra. Que yo sepa no se puede hacer más de un referral por persona.

Vamos, que hay maneras de reducir el coste total del MBA, aunque está claro que si uno no consigue becas, lo normal es endeudarse. Yo lo veo como una inversión en uno mismo. Muy probablemente la mejor inversión que haré en mi vida.

Por cierto, he recibido comentarios en este blog y en otros sitios que me comentan que los MBA como éste solo los pueden hacer gente con dinero, lo que me parece absolutamente falso. La gran mayoría hemos pedido un préstamo para pagar el programa, que lo iremos pagando con el trabajo post-MBA. Desgraciadamente, en España aún hay gente que está convencida de que quienes estudiamos en escuelas como ésta es porque nos lo han pagado nuestros padres millonarios. Esto no puede estar más alejado de la realidad, cualquier persona que quiera acceder a un MBA y tenga un perfil para ser admitido, puede hacerlo.

Perú y Miami: resumen de un gran viaje

La semana pasada estuve de viaje en Perú y en Miami. Fui con Rocío más tres amigos del MBA, un libanés, una colombiana y un francés. El viaje ha sido genial. Perú, fantástico. Os dejo un “breve” resumen del viaje a continuación.

Salimos de Chicago el sábado 23 por la noche y después de tres vuelos llegamos a Cuzco (volamos Chicago-Miami-Lima-Cuzco, o Cusco como llaman allí a la ciudad), a las 7 de la mañana del domingo. El viaje fue bastante estresante porque el primer vuelo salió con una hora de retraso y cogimos los dos siguientes por cuestión de minutos, después de recorrer corriendo ambos aeropuertos. Cuzco está a 3.400 metros de altitud, y ya nos habían advertido por activa y por pasiva que tuviéramos cuidado con el “mal de altura”. Sin casi haber dormido nada, fuimos al hotel y después de tomar té de coca, nos fuimos a dormir un rato. A las 12 nos vinieron a recoger y fuimos a ver parte de la ciudad y varias zonas de ruinas incas como Sacsayhuaman, varias de ellas situadas a 4.000 metros de altura o cerca. Nuestros cuerpos empezaron a acusar la falta de oxígeno por la altura, el no haber dormido apenas, y el no haber comido mucho. Varios de nosotros empezamos a sentir intensos dolores de cabeza. Por la noche, sentía mi cabeza que estaba a punto de estallar y se me juntó con náuseas que degeneraron en vómitos. Con suerte, en el hotel estaban acostumbrados a estas cosas, y tenían botellas de oxígeno. Me “enchufaron” a una de ella durante 20 minutos, me tomé un par de paracetamoles, y mejoré substancialmente. A la mañana siguiente me dieron otro chute de oxígeno y listo. Lo cierto es que no fui el único, en uno de los autobuses un niño perdió el conocimiento y otra chica se puso a vomitar en mitad del autobús… menudo paripé se montó en mitad de las montañas.

La ciudad de Cuzco nos gustó mucho. Fue capital del imperio Inca y hay ruinas por todas partes. Visitamos sitios emblemáticos de la ciudad como la Plaza de Armas, Iglesia de la Compañía, paseamos mucho por sus calles, visitamos mercados típicos, etc. Y comimos muy bien. Destaco el restaurante Cicciolina, fantástico.

Cuzco

Cuzco

Aunque he viajado mucho por Europa, Nortemamérica y Asia, nunca había visitado un país latinoamericano, por lo que, entre otras cosas, me daba mucha curiosidad ver el sentimiento que gente local tiene hacia los españoles y la época colonial. Rápidamente nuestro guía nos dejó claro por activa y por pasiva su sentimiento claramente negativo hacia todo lo que hicieron los españoles en esa zona, con incontables referencias a todo lo que los españoles robaron e hicieron durante la época colonial. De todas maneras, la percepción con la que me quedé es que la mayoría de gente entiende que los españoles del siglo XXI no somos los mismos que los de hace cinco siglos. Tengo que decir que el trato que nos han dado ha sido fabuloso durante todo el viaje, incluso incluyendo taxistas de la calle que cogimos en Lima (nos habían avisado de que nunca cogiéramos taxis de la calle, aunque al final lo hicimos, hartos de esperar a los taxistas “seguros”; no tuvimos ningún problema).

Durante los primeros cuatro días cada noche dormimos en un sitio. Después del primer día de Cuzco, al día siguiente visitamos el Valle Sagrado de los Incas. Se llama Sagrado porque era muy apreciado por los incas debido a sus especiales cualidades geográficas y climáticas. Es una zona muy rica y donde, según dicen, se produce el mejor maíz del país. Visitamos un conjunto de ruinas incas bastante espectacular y también el pueblo de Písac.

Valle Sagrado

Valle Sagrado

IMG_5961

Valle Sagrado

IMG_5968

Písac

IMG_5977

Cusqueña, compañera de viaje

Por la tarde cogimos el IncaRail, un tren que va desde Urubamba, donde también visitamos la fortaleza de Ollantaytambo, hasta Aguas Calientes, el pueblo que está en la base de Machu Picchu. Aguas Calientes es un pueblo encajonado en un valle espectacular. Es un pueblo muy turístico surgido de la nada después del descubrimiento de Machu Picchu a principios del siglo pasado.

sss

Urubamba

Tren a Machu Picchu

Tren a Machu Picchu

Valle de Machu Picchu

Valle de Machu Picchu

Al día siguiente nos pasamos el día en Machu Picchu, el highlight del viaje. Simplemente espectacular. Me había hecho a la idea de que el sitio me iba a defraudar de tanto verlo en fotos y de oír a tanta gente hablar de ello. Todo lo contrario, me pareció espectacular, no solo lo que son las ruinas sino también por la ubicación y el paisaje que las rodea. Aunque nos llovió bastante, al final del día abrió y la visibilidad aumentó mucho. Mejor fotos que palabras:

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

IMG_6092

Machu Picchu

IMG_6139

Machu Picchu

IMG_6177

Machu Picchu

IMG_6234

Machu Picchu

Ruinas en Machu Picchu

Ruinas en Machu Picchu

IMG_6262

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

Machu Picchu

IMG_6272

Machu Picchu

Al día siguiente volvimos a Cuzco, donde pasamos otro día, y luego viajamos a Lima, donde pasamos dos noches. En Lima más que turismo callejero lo que hicimos fue turismo gastronómico, ya que entre los que fuimos al viaje todos somos fans de la comida peruana. Compañeros peruanos del MBA nos habían recomendado varios restaurantes, aunque no todos los que nos habían comentado estaban abiertos por ser Semana Santa. Fuimos a Pescados Capitales, Cala y La Mar (me quedo con el primero).

Vuelo Cuzco-Lima

Vuelo Cuzco-Lima

Lima, muy diferente a Cuzco, es una ciudad muy grande y mucho más moderna. La ciudad es bastante caótica, conducción muy agresiva, respeto limitado a las señales de tráfico, y mucho tráfico. Por ejemplo, tardamos más de tres horas en taxi desde el aeropuerto al hotel, que estaba en el barrio de Miraflores. Me recordó en ciertos aspectos a algunas de las ciudades asiáticas que visité cuando vivía allí. En Lima nos alojamos en un hotel en el barrio de Miraflores, un barrio que me gustó mucho. También el barrio de Barranco, donde salimos por la noche.

Después de Lima, cogimos un avión a Miami, donde pasamos tres noches. Nos alojamos en South Beach en un apartamento alquilado por Airbnb. En Miami ya os podréis imaginar: lo típico, playa y fiesta. Aún así, uno de los días alquilamos un coche y visitamos el Everglades National Park, que está a 1 ó 2 horas de Miami. Hicimos un tour en “Airboat” por el parque que estuvo muy bien. Cocodrilos por todas partes.

Everglades

Everglades

Everglades

Everglades

En definitiva, un gran viaje!!